Sunday, 8 April 2018

Potato Friands

I know it sounds a bit whacky, 'cos they are sweet little treats normally.  But these are my savoury vegetable version.  It all started with a recipe that I found in Molly Yeh's book Molly on the Range, for tater tot hotdish.  Here in Oz we call them potato gems, but you know what I mean - grated potato turned into bite-sized morsels which are fried (usually) or baked.  Apparently hotdish (huh?) is a traditional main course in the Upper Mid-West of the US, which is often covered with a tater tot (potato gem) blanket.  I guess it's like shepherd's pie or a pot pie, where we would smother it in mashed potato or a layer of puff pastry :=) 

I didn't like the idea of covering a casserole in oily, over-salted frozen gems so I made my own version instead.  I have a thing about frying, so they were always going to be baked.  (If frying is ever necessary, that is Mr P.'s job.)  Thinking of a cute shape to bake them in, I came across my friand tin - et voilà.  Here we have savoury, delicious mouthfuls that can be served as a side or as a topping for your favourite casserole/hotdish.  (Keep an eye out for my next post, where I use these as a topping on a chicken pot pie/casserole/hotdish.)





tasty little treats


Recipe by Sherry's Pickings:


ingredients:


600g. (1.32 lb) red potatoes

2 large eggs, lightly beaten

3 level tbs plain flour

1 tsp sea salt

black pepper to taste

1 tsp mustard powder

2 tsp lightly dried parsley or 1-2 tbs fresh, chopped parsley

1.5 tbs (30g.) butter, melted



Method:


Coarsely grate the raw, unpeeled potatoes - I used a food processor, but you could use a box grater if you want to build up some upper arm muscles

Tip them into a microwave safe bowl, cover and zap on high for 3 minutes - they will still be a bit crunchy

Place them into a large mixing bowl

Stir in the rest of the ingredients, except the butter

Grab a 12-hole friand tin and butter the holes generously, all up the sides too - sticking to the bottom is not an option:=)

Now this is where you decide if you want chunky friands as a side dish or thin, elegant ones that will go on top of a pot pie, for example

So either bake 12 chunky friands at 220C on a high shelf for about 15 mins. or till golden, OR divvy up the mixture and bake 24 slender, elegant ones for about 10 mins.  Obviously you would need to take the first lot out, then re-butter the holes and bake the second lot.  Or you may have 2 friand tins, lucky you!  I baked 'em chunky.



Notes:


FYI - I weighed out one tbs of flour = 12 grams, so 3 tbs = 36 g.  So 3-4 US tablespoons would be fine, as they are smaller than Aussie ones.




ingredients gathered



ready for stirring



pack the mixture firmly into each of the holes 



ready for eating after 15 mins. @ 220C



feeling hungry?




my potato doodle


14 comments:

  1. The hotdish is native to Minnesota and maybe the Dakotas. Your delicious-sounding tater tot substitute would probably disqualify your casserole as a genuine hotdish, because the hotdish is made from convenience ingredients. For a detailed discussion of the topic, I recommend this article:

    https://www.eater.com/2016/5/15/11611558/what-is-hotdish

    It even cites Molly Yeh as an expert!

    best... mae at maefood.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Mae
      That’s funny. Citing Molly are they? The young Asian import (to the Midwest i mean) as an expert. Thanks for the comment. I will check out the article as it is quite fascinating to me. Cheers S x

      Delete
  2. These potato items were so tasty! Yummo i say.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I really like the sound of your version Sherry with the home made potato! :D

    ReplyDelete
  4. These look tasty and easy. I love the idea of topping a casserole with them. I must confess to a slight weakness for potato gems - although i'm not sure about putting them on top of a dish. I think i'd stick to something more like your version. I've done something similar to your recipes to make individual potato bake style nests before which were pretty tasty, but also pretty rich.
    These would also be great as a brunch hash brown stand in.
    Thanks for the recipe.
    Cheers,
    Laura

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Laura
      I know what you mean about potato gems. They are a bit tempting. But maybe not on top of a casserole. Cheers Sherry

      Delete
  5. These are a great idea. I am with you on not wanting a blanket of potato gems on a casserole.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I can totally see how these would work Sherry. Looks delish to me!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hi Sherry, I had no idea what a tatter tot was until now and they are very similar to hash browns. I hate frying too, luckily it's not nessecary for most dishes. I will be giving these gems a try.

    xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi unknown
      Nice to have you drop by! And such a mystery too. Your identity I mean. Cheers S

      Delete

I would love to hear from you. Please leave your comment and I will reply as soon as I can. If you have problems commenting, please try without your WordPress profile. You can try Anonymous (add your name in the text) or your Google account if you have one.